Where to Buy Domain Names

Registrars

Namesilo are my go to registrar for .coms and virtually any extension they support. They offer competitive pricing, free whois and I have always had good support/customer service experiences with them. They also have a discount program for name fiends like me 🙂

Namecheap are my second preference and are my go to for TLDs that Namesilo don’t support such as .com.au and .io. They also offer free whois.

GoDaddy are the largest registrar and are OK but are generally more expensive than Namesilo and Namecheap, don’t offer free whois and are a little sleazy.

Name.com seem decent though I have only used them to register internetartist.org as they had good pricing for .org names.

Crazy Domains used to be the best place to register .com.au but now I would recommend either Namecheap or GoDaddy as they don’t

EuroDNS and NetIM are good for exotic European extensions such as .lu, .ee and .gg 😀

Auction/marketplace sites

Godaddy Auctions probably has the largest inventory and a good place to find keyword domains. Has a combination buy now, offer/counter offer, expired name and public auctions. Auctions tend to go crazy at the end. I have used service but have never won good names (though there are lots there).

Flippa is better known as the leading website/app marketplace however they have a selection of domain too. Names probably tend to go for higher prices on Flippa than GoDaddy amd NameJet but it is still worth checking listings. I flipped a few names here in the early 2010s 🙂

Sedo has been around for a long time but to be honest I have never used the service.

Namejet is a neat platform that is well known in the domaining community but maybe not outside of it. I bought juug.com and opk.net there 🙂 It is particularly good for 3 and 4 letter names as well as higher end keyword names.

4cn is a Chinese marketplace so it is a little hard to understand what the heck is going on but there are some nice names there and it is where I bought duud.com :D!

eBay has decent names pop up from time to time but you need to be careful if paying by PayPal as digital products do not qualify for buyer protection and i have definately seen some dodgy listings.

Drop catching sites

NameJet and SnapNames joined forces in early 2016 in order to enhance their domain back ordering services. This being the case, it is only necessary to back order domains on one site or the other. Namejet publish all back ordered domains (potentially increasing interest/competition) so I recommend paying the extra $10 to use SnapNames.

DropCatch are probably the best drop catchers in the business but I AM MAD AT THEM. Their verification is more stringent than Namejet and other auction sites and as I result I missed out on a great name :'( If you are serious about catching an expired domain make sure to get your account setup and verified well ahead of time. The other issue is that unlike NameJet and SnapNames back order auctions (which are private auctions between those that back ordered the name), all DropCatch auctions are public. This means that there is really no point back ordering names on DropCatch as if they catch a name you will be able to bid after the fact. Using their platform for back orders increases the chance of a public auction/higher sale price.

Pheenix & Dynadot both offer a more affordable back ordering service for names that you want to catch but don’t think will have much competition/don’t mind losing. I have not used either service yet, though I will probably use Pheenix first as it is more well known in the domaining community. Freshdrop do not offer backordering services however they offer a great service for researching pending delete names.

The open web/private sales

If you think of a name that you like you can always try navigating directly to the domain (for example SalesJazz.com ;). Often names that are available for sale will say so clearly on the homepage. If not, you can always try a whois search.

*Photo by Creative Kersers

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